Guatemala 2017

For your reports/images, made outside Europe and the "Mediterranean" countries. Not to be too narrow minded and limited to our European/Mediterranean herps.

Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Laura Bok » Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:45 pm

Thank you very much for your comments so far guys!

Matthieu wrote:So much caudata... I know some guys and girl so happy :mrgreen:

Oh yes, you can imagine the salamander lovers had a blast ;)

Jeroen wrote: The only thing missing in these outstanding(!!!) pictures is me.

:lol: True dat! But don´t say we didn´t ask ;)

Miguel wrote: I just wonder; how long does it take to organise all the pictures you take?

Well, we came back in the beginning of September, and I basically was through with sorting and editing exactly one month later. I work full-time, so I only worked on the pictures in the mornings and evenings, or weekends. I love it though, so I am always sad when I am done with it...

Niklas wrote:Nice content as always! What are you using for make the light of your flash so soft? I love the look!

Thank you! I use a self-built diffusor. I guess any softbox / diffusor will yield similar results, as long as it diffuses the light well enough.
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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Robin Duborget » Wed Oct 18, 2017 1:36 pm

One word : fantastic !
Some species are very beautiful, this B.lincolni for example.

For a salamander lover like me, it's very difficult to see this without being a bit jealous. But jealous in the good way of course, just wanting to take a plane to Guatemala ;)

It's impressive because you saw a lot of salamander species. I have little experience with neotropical Urodela, but in my mind it was very cryptic species, very difficult to see for most species.
In Costa Rica we saw only three species (and only five/six individuals !).

So, two solution : we are bad at looking for neotropical salamanders, or they are more common further north, in mexico and Guatemala than in more tropical countries like Costa-Rica and Panama.

Robin

ps : By chance, did you take pictures of some grasshoppers/crickets/katytids ? Neotropical species are impressive.
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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Laura Bok » Wed Oct 18, 2017 9:12 pm

Thanks a lot for your kind words Robin!

Robin wrote:It's impressive because you saw a lot of salamander species. I have little experience with neotropical Urodela, but in my mind it was very cryptic species, very difficult to see for most species.
In Costa Rica we saw only three species (and only five/six individuals !).

All the experience I have with neotropical salamanders comes down to Guatemala, so I guess that is also not much. I did get the feeling though that it differs a lot with the conditions, and thus, from night to night. Some species you only get to see when they are active, so it also depends quite a bit on how lucky your timing is...

Robin wrote:ps : By chance, did you take pictures of some grasshoppers/crickets/katytids ? Neotropical species are impressive.

They were indeed impressive, but all I can offer are some rather crappy iPhone shots. Well I guess thats better than nothing, so here is a compilation of the most impressive non-herps (the first one is cheated a bit when I say "non-herps", but even more interesting for the size comparison :shock: !):

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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Guillaume Gomard » Fri Oct 20, 2017 4:43 pm

You are very lucky with the Deinopis find, it's not easy to observe these fascinating creatures!
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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Robin Duborget » Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:02 pm

Interesting, but difficult to identify.

The first is something from the Pseudophyllinae family, like the leaf mimicking one in the end (but the last is at least a Pterochrozini, maybe from the genus Mimetica)
The 5th bug isa katytid of the genus Orophus
The two big grasshoppers are Romaleidae.
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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Laura Bok » Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:44 pm

Unbelievable and amazing news from Guatemala:
https://www.globalwildlife.org/press-ro ... ign=buffer

And damn, we were so close...
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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Jeroen Speybroeck » Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:59 pm

That is GREAT news!!!

(there's a link to some more photos on the page)
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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Bobby Bok » Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:53 pm

Such a beautiful species. On the one hand I am so excited that this iconic species is still around. But having been so close to it last summer and not seeing it does hurt a bit!
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Re: Guatemala 2017

Postby Evgeny Kotelevsky » Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:11 pm

Laura Bok wrote:Unbelievable and amazing news from Guatemala:
https://www.globalwildlife.org/press-ro ... ign=buffer

And damn, we were so close...


Great news! I wish I could join one of their expeditions!
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